James C. Hopkins


James C. Hopkins was born in Washington, DC and raised in the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia. He received a BA degree in French language and literature from Duke University. In 1992, he received a Jenny McKeane Moore scholarship for poetry at George Washington University, to study with John Haines, and has been writing and performing his poetry since. His work has appeared in many literary journals, e-zines and anthologies, including Potomac Reviews, Minimus, Frantic Egg, WordWrights!, and Innisfree Poetry Journal.


He is the author of 4 volumes of poetry: a chapbook entitled The Walnut Tree Waits for Its Bees (1997), Eight Pale Women (2003), The Blue Door (in collaboration withYoko Danno, 2006) and a sleeping tiger dreams of manhattan (in collaboration with Danno and Bernard Stoltz, 2008). A retired investment broker, James lives alternately in Washington, DC., and Kathmandu, where he studies Buddhist philosophy at a Tibetan monastery and directs microfinance project in a nearby encampment of Indian beggars. Quilts for Kids Nepal. His most recent book, MANY THREADS: Invisible Children of Nepal (The Ikuta Press, 2012), is a book of photographs and verse based on his experiences in that community.

He organizes Himalayan Writers Workshop in Kathmandu.

Books:
The Walnut Tree Waits for Its Bees, Mica Press, Washington, DC, 1997

Eight Pale Women, The Word Works, Washington, DC, 2003
book review by Grace Cavalieri

The Blue Door (in collaboration with Yoko Danno), The Word Works, 2006
the blue door

a sleeping tiger dreams of manhattan: simultaneous poetry, photographs and music
  by James C. Hopkins (poetry and photographs), Yoko Danno (poetry)
  and Bernared Stoltz (music), The Ikuta Press, Kobe, 2008

"a sleeping tiger dreams of manhattan" was translated into Latvian and published
 by Mansards Publishing House, Latvia, in September 2012.

Many Threads: Invisible Children of Nepal (The Ikuta Press, 2012)

Work in progress:
Scrolls: collaboration with Yoko Danno
   (Scrolls is posted as "an experimental work in progress" in Jerome Rothenberg's
    Poems and Poetics.)